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"Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated." —Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea


“The emergence of Hemingway gave the Modern Movement one of its few men of action... No other writer stepped so suddenly into fame, or destroyed with such insouciance so many other writers or ways of writing or became such an immediate symbol of an age.” —Cyril Connolly

Ernest Hemingway exploded onto the literary scene with The Sun Also Rises, his bracing novel about decadent expatriates recovering—along with the rest of Europe—from the wounds inflicted by the First World War. This is one of the two rarest and most desirable dust jackets in 20th-century American literature (the other being his friend and rival F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby). The first-issue dust jacket printed in error the title of Hemingway’s book of short stories as “In Our Times” rather than “In Our Time” on the front panel—later issues corrected this mistake

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BOOKS BY ERNEST HEMINGWAY

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Found 17 books(s). Showing results 1 thru 10.


A GREAT RARITY AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF ALL HEMINGWAY ASSOCIATION COPIES

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. In Our Time. New York, 1925. First edition, a superb association copy, of the first of Hemingway’s books published in the United States, one of only 1335 copies. This copy warmly inscribed by Hemingway to Eric Edward “Chink” Dorman-Smith, Hemingway’s hero and first and closest adult friend and the dedicatee of in our time, the earlier collection of short stories that formed the nucleus of In Our Time : “To Chink with Hommages Respectueux from his former A.D.C. [aide-de-camp] and still, with the occasional permission of His Brittanic Majesty, companion—Popplethwaite, Paris, October 1925.” $78,000.
“THE GERMANS OMITTED THE JOHN DONNE!”

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Six novels in translation. Various cities, 1928-1953. Seven volumes altogether. Rare collection of six Hemingway novels in translation, mostly first editions, from the library of Hemingway friend and scholar Fraser Drew with his bookplate, each volume signed or inscribed by Hemingway. Herein is the first German edition of The Sun Also Rises (Fiesta), an advance review copy with laid-in publisher’s slip, signed by Heminway; the first German edition of For Whom the Bell Tolls (Wem die Stunde Schlägt), an advance review copy with laid-in publisher’s materials, inscribed, “For Frazer [sic] Bragg Drew, best wishes always, Ernest Hemingway. (Note how the Germans omitted the John Donne!) EH”; an early French edition of A Farewell to Arms (L’adieu aux armes), inscribed on the half title, “For Frazer [sic] Drew, hoping he has a good trip home, Ernest Hemingway”; the first Latvian edition of A Farewell to Arms (Ardievas lerociem), inscribed on the half title, “For Fraser Bragg Drew, from his friend Ernest Hemingway (Read this for home-work) EH.”: the first Italian edition of The Old Man and the Sea (Il vecchio e il mare), with nine full-page color and black-and-white illustrations and original belly band, inscribed “For Frazer [sic] Drew, ‘Il huovo cafalarioro’ [sic] with pictures of no great value, Ernest Hemingway,” and the two-volume early Italian edition, wrappers, of For Whom the Bell Tolls, inscribed on the half title in the first volume, “For Frazer [sic] Drew, this corny edition, best always, Ernest Hemingway,” and on the half title of the second volume, “For Frazer [sic] Drew: Volume two of For Whom the Bell Tolls with horrible cover. Best luck, Ernest Hemingway. 1955.” This extraordinary collection handsomely housed in a custom box. $45,000.

“TO GUY WITH MUCH AFFECTION, ERNEST, PARIS, OCT 28, 1933”: EXCEEDINGLY RARE PRESENTATION/ASSOCIATION FIRST EDITION OF HEMINGWAY’S WINNER TAKE NOTHING, INSCRIBED AND DATED BY HIM IN PARIS THE DAY AFTER PUBLICATION TO LONGTIME CLOSE FRIEND, JOURNALIST GUY HICKOK, WITH BOOKSELLER TICKET OF SYLVIA BEACH'S FAMED PARIS BOOK STORE, SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. None Winner Take Nothing. New York, 1933. First edition of Hemingway’s famed collection of short stories, an especially rare presentation/association copy warmly inscribed by Hemingway in Paris the day after publication to his close friend, journalist Guy Hickok, "To Guy with much affection, Ernest, Paris Oct 28, 1933." Hemingway and Hickok, bureau chief of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, shared a love of “boxing, horse racing, human interest stories, and tall tales. Ernest never crossed the Seine without dropping in at the sign of the Eagle" and their trip across in Italy in 1927 inspired Hemingway's short story, “Che Ti Dice la Patria?," this rare copy also with the bookseller ticket of Sylvia Beach's famed Paris bookshop, Shakespeare and Company, where Hemingway "had a chance to see the first copies of Winner Take Nothing, which had just been shipped over by Scribner’s. He liked the jacket, which he had not seen before” (My Brother, 139). . $45,000.

SCARCE FIRST ISSUE OF THE SUN ALSO RISES,
INSCRIBED BY THE DEDICATEE, HEMINGWAY’S FIRST WIFE,
HADLEY RICHARDSON

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Sun Also Rises. WITH: Kimmel's Strange Voyage. WITH: Issue of Lost Generation Journal. San Francisco, 1921. First edition, first issue, an extraordinary association copy, inscribed by Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley, to author and interviewer Lawrence Broer: “Best wishes to Larry & Kris from one who saw the Sun Also Rise. Sincerely, Hadley R. Mowrer.” Hadley was, of course, the dedicatee of the novel; Broer was a noted Hemingway scholar, who apparently asked Hadley to inscribe his own copy (a second inscription identifies this copy as originally his). Accompanied by Stanley Kimmel’s book of verse and an issue of Lost Generation Journal containing Broer’s signed article on Kimmel. The Kimmels were close friends of the Hemingways in Paris. $25,000.
HEMINGWAY’S HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEXTBOOK, SIGNED, DOODLED AND ANNOTATED BY HIM

ARMES, William Dallam, editor. Old English Ballads and Folk Songs. New York, 1912. Ernest Hemingway’s freshman high school textbook “Old English Ballads,” signed twice by him, and with annotations and numerous doodles, including two caricatures of his teacher, Frank James Platt, who is credited with shaping Hemingway’s literary career. $16,500.
HEMINGWAY’S READING LIST

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Autograph letter signed. Ketchum, Idaho, October 27, 1958. Fine autograph letter signed from Hemingway to a bookseller detailing an order of books he would like shipped to him, including Graham Greene’s Our Man in Havana, a biography of Steven Vincent Benet, and multiple copies of several of his own titles, two of which were out of print at this point in his life. $14,500.

INSCRIBED AND SIGNED BY HEMINGWAY

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Old Man and the Sea. New York, 1956. Early printing, a scarce presentation copy of Hemingway’s masterful tale of “a fishing adventure… as close to tragedy as fishing may be” (New York Times), inscribed by him on the front free endpaper: “To James —- with sincere best wishes always, Ernest Hemingway.” $11,500.

“WE HAVE BEEN SO HAPPY AND HAVING RISKED IT ALL KNOW WHAT IT WAS WE RISKED AND WHAT LONELINESS IS…”

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Typed Letter Signed to Edna Gellhorn. Cuba, 1940. Typed letter from Ernest Hemingway to his future mother-in-law, Edna Gellhorn (the mother of Martha Gellhorn, his third wife), signed: “much love from Ernest.” $8500.
HEMINGWAY’S WORKS IN FRENCH, A FINE ILLUSTRATED LIMITED EDITION

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Oeuvres Completes. Paris, 1963-65. Eight volumes. Limited illustrated eight-volume edition of Hemingway’s works translated into French, number 2553 of 5000 copies, with original lithographs by eight different French artists, including Minaux, Carzou, Guiramand and Fontanarosa. Handsomely bound by Desclée. $4500.
“THE PRETENTIOUS FAKING BASTARDS…”

HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Torrents of Spring. New York, 1926. Rare first edition of Hemingway’s satiric first novel, in original first-issue dust jacket. $4500.

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